Xinnet Registration Agreement

The two companies, eName (www.ename.com/) and Xin Net Technology (xinnet.com/), are domain name registrars. They sell domain names and the corresponding registration services that make it possible to find a website on the Internet, said Gary Warner, director of computer forensics research in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Alabama. The Internet`s addressing system supervisor, iCANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), can put pressure on Xin Net and eName, Warner said. ICANN could warn companies that their domain name registration features could be removed as ICANN accredits them, Warner said. Warner, which is leading a research project to track spam trends, said both companies accept domain name registrations from bad actors that can be attributed to illegal activities and spam. EName has allowed the registration of websites that sell software that will allow users to spy on other people`s SMS messages, Warner said. The company also allows the registration of domain names hosted on botnets or networks of computers infected with malware. From June 2008 to February, KnujOn said it found 34,283 illegal domains connected to Xin Net, covering unregulated prescription drugs, pirated software, and counterfeit consumer goods. Xin Net ranked first on a list of the most abused registrars released earlier this year by KnujOn, an organization dedicated to fighting spam. It received the same rank last year. Xin Net`s “manage at once” policy may “work well for legitimate businesses, but it doesn`t work if you have cybercriminals as customers,” Warner said.

But just two years ago, China`s CERT had only three English speakers trying to handle a massive workload: the agency was receiving up to 9,000 abuse complaints a day, Warner said. ICANN could potentially reduce the ability of Xin Net and eName to register generic top-level domains such as “.com”. However, recent research by Warner`s spam team has shown that a large percentage of spam-related domains ended up on “.cn,” the country-specific top-level domain for China. .