Stanford Data Use Agreement

A Data Use Agreement (DUA) is a contract that governs the exchange of certain data between two parties. AEDs determine who can use and obtain an unequivocal set of data, as well as the uses and information authorized by the data by the recipient. A DUA also assigns appropriate responsibility for the use of the data to the researcher and recipient. Data agreements with obligations on the part of the university are verified by one of the above-mentioned contract offices. For more information on the processing of data agreements and who can sign them, see the February 2015 memo of the Vice Prophet and Deskans for Research. Protected health information is data “that goes beyond what would qualify as an LDS” – Sharing PHI data will require a business association agreement if participants have not signed a HIPC authorization for data sharing. A DUA should not be used if there is a funding agreement between the UAB and the other entity for the same project. The financing agreement for the project should address the exchange of data. Only the following identifiers can contain limited records: Please read both Starting Point to Applying for dbGaP Data and dbGaP Individual-Level Data Access Request Procedures for NCBI`s detailed instructions for requesting data access. prohibit the recipient from using or disclosing the information, unless the agreement permits or otherwise permits; Developed and operated and archived by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) of the National Library of Medicine, DbGaP distributes data from studies that have investigated the link between phenotype and genotype, such as.B genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

A Data Use Agreement (DUA) is an agreement that is necessary and must be entered into in accordance with the data protection rule before a limited data set (defined below) is used or disclosed to an external institution or party. A limited set of data is always Protected Health Information (PHI), and that`s why covered companies like Stanford have to enter into a data usage agreement with each recipient of a limited set of Stanford data. The completed DUA application form provides the head of the OSR with the necessary background information about the research. A project summary, a list of data elements, funding sources, expectations for sharing results and who authored the publication, and respect for human/animal/stem cells (if any) are essential to ensure that the conditions of the DUA are appropriate. . . .